Archives For psychology

After bashing Apple a little on its lack of innovative breakthroughs in iOS following WWDC, I am going to praise them a little here.  Cult of Mac published this post about how the iOS7 design is a masterpiece.  While I don’t think the interface design itself brings distinctly unique elements that we haven’t seen in Android and Windows, there is some truth to the iOS design being amazing.  Notice I didn’t say iOS7 – because the brilliance is applicable to all iOS designs from day one.  In spirit, this goes to one of Steve Jobs’ quotes about design – “Design is not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works.”. 

If you had a flawless interface design implemented with stutter, that automatically means it is not a brilliant overall design.  While design elements are certainly getting amazing on Android, the feel of the interfaces are still short of flawless.  This is the real place where iOS continues to shine.  The touch interface must be psychologically satisfying and stimulating to the user.  When you touch an icon, the interface must react like it was touched.  The animation of going from a small icon to filling the screen and back to dispersing and collapsing into the icon’s spot without any glitch whatsoever provides the user with such visual pleasure that we want to keep coming back to the experience!

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Consider this simple case of touching to copy text.  I’ve been attracted to the iOS text selection for a while. A long touch usually selects the right section of text that might be of interest to the user.  As in the screenshot above, it will select the relevant paragraph in such a case.  In another case, it might select a link or text in a bullet, etc. It is a small detail – but the attention to detail is superb!  

Psychological satisfaction should be the goal of every design.  Every action should be designed and implemented with the goal of providing the user an incentive to come back to perform the action.  And this is almost always about elements in design, software and hardware all coming together to produce that brilliant experience.  Even if one of those elements is less than ideal in the way it functions, the experience is going to be less than ideal.  This is why integrating multiple disciplines of engineering and design and iterating over the experience until perfection is accomplished is paramount.  

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It is certainly the era of user experience.  An era where Apple is teaching the rest of the world about the importance of user experience – one where others are learning fast to figure out how to get it right and be a player.  An era where user experience as a science is getting its due credit.  One where it is clear that computer science in isolation does not make or sell great products.

This does lead to the question of the end goals of a perfect and intuitive user experience. Is it really about the user? Do Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Google, Microsoft and others care so deeply about their users that they feel compelled to pour billions into getting this right? Maybe – but, just a little bit!

As is evident from the numerous patent wars, no one wants to get along in this game. Sure, the patent wars are broader than user experience at the face of it, but isn’t everything about the user? Faster speeds, lower power processors, better networks, more memory, better applications, slicker UIs, you name it – if it isn’t about the user of the product, there would be no incentive in investing in it.  So, why then can the players not get along to create the best unified experiences?

The end game here is hypnosis – yes, it is an era of digital hypnotism.  Wikipedia describes the characteristics of hypnosis as “The hypnotized individual appears to heed only the communications of the hypnotist. He seems to respond in an uncritical, automatic fashion, ignoring all aspects of the environment other than those pointed out to him by the hypnotist.”, among other things.  Every player in this game is trying to be a hypnotist and the subject is the user.  User experience is a means to an end.

Let’s parse it a bit further.  Apple has demonstrable success in the art of hypnotizing the user.  By creating intuitive, simple to use products, they built a faithful user base.  A user base that will adapt to their products and swear by their products.  They look past flaws in their products to the extent that flaws appear to be a feature.  Having established that loyalty, they enjoy the luxury of rolling out a flawed product (Maps of course!), a highly important one at that, and still not losing the user base!  It is a perfect win for their years of investments in user experience!

There are no incentives in working together – when everyone wants to claim the user, there is no question of unity.  After all, multiple simultaneous hypnosis is proven hard in psychology!  As every one of these major players try to grab every piece of data about the user that can be used to bring them under their influence, the users themselves are undergoing a transformation.  We talk less and type more.  We smile less and use more smileys (more on this later).  Running out of battery on our phones is our biggest fear.

It is a new world.  As long as the net result is making our lives better, being hypnotized by one of these players may just be par for the course.  We win some, we lose some.  As in psychology, you can only be hypnotized if you want to be hypnotized.  As every big player tries to do everything, they are trying to take over the users’ lives in totality.  They want to know our past and present and predict our future.  Or, better still, lead us towards paths we will be happy to follow.  The trick is in having enough snippets of what we, the users, want to do.  Once we are hooked (err, hypnotized), we will do as we are told!